12
Nov

How to Ace a Startup Interview

{This article originally appeared on Glassdoor}

Companies aren’t created equal, nor are their interview processes. But for job seekers interviewing at a startup, the differences are great compared to doing the dance with an established company.

“At a startup, we look for hackers,” says Greg Skloot, co-founder and CEO of startup Attend.com, the event planning software maker. “We want to see people that can get a lot done quickly, and with very few resources. A startup might not care as much about formalities like GPA, attire, etc. Startups champion the underdog.” Read more

30
Oct

Lying on Your Resume? Here’s How You’ll Get Caught.

{This article originally appeared on Glassdoor.}

Honesty isn’t the best policy, at least according to some job seekers. People often stretch the truth on their resumes and cover letters in an attempt to land work, new research by OfficeTeam has revealed.

Nearly half of workers surveyed by the staffing company say they know someone who lied on their resume. That’s a 25% increase from 2011. Fifty-three percent of managers have a sneaking suspicion that candidates are often dishonest, and 38% have said no to an applicant after discovering their lies. Read more

16
Oct

5 Ways To Take On More Responsibility At Work

{Click here to read the original article on The Muse.}

So you’re doing a good job at work. Your boss seems happy. And now, you’re ready to take on more. Read more

25
Sep

What You Need To Do To Find The Best Sales Jobs

{Click here to read the original article on Career Enlightenment.}

Your current sales job isn’t working out, and you’re ready to move on to greener pastures. But as you start looking for jobs, you notice that every post looks the same. So, how do you choose the right one? Read more

4
Sep

5 Networking Mistakes That Keep You From Getting Ahead

{Click here to read the original article on Time.com.}

Every single roundup of career advice out there talks about the importance of networking. Less talked-about but just as important is doing it correctly. You might think you’re doing all the right things by hanging out near the boss at the sales retreat or passing out your business card to everybody you meet at the trade show reception — but in reality, bad networking technique can do as much damage to your career as not networking at all.

Here are some common pitfalls experts warn against falling into.

Relying on online social networks.

Yes, LinkedIn and its ilk can be a great way to further your network, but the point of networking is to actually, you know, meet people. James Jeffries, director of career development at Bard College at Simon’s Rock, says this is a mistake young workers especially need to be conscious of, since they grew up having simultaneous online and real-life relationships. “As networking becomes synonymous with online networking… they can neglect the importance of actually meeting up with people for coffee, making a phone call, or showing up at an event. So far online connections have not supplanted these traditional interactions,” he says.

Staying in your comfort zone.

Mingling with others at corporate, industry or alumni functions isn’t going to be nearly as effective if you just hang out with people you know. Yes, it’s a good idea to catch up with acquaintances, but unless you push yourself out of your comfort zone and meet new people, you’re limiting the effectiveness of your networking, says Amanda Augustine, job search expert at mobile career network TheLadders. “Casual networking events at local watering holes can quickly turn into mini-reunions with the friends you already see on a regular basis,” she says in a post on the company’s blog. Augustine says you should set a goal of talking to three new people at every event you attend. “They have the most potential to expand your network the furthest,” she says.

Doing the business-card “drive-by.”

Some people take the other extreme when it comes to networking. They’re so determined to meet as many new people as possible that they have it down to a science: A quick introduction, handshake and then they’re pushing their business card into the person’s palm and moving on before the other person can catch their breath. “Networking is not a race to distribute as many business cards or get as many cards as possible,” career coach Yvonne Ruke Akpoveta advises on the blog of her consulting firm, OliveBlue. To be effective, networking needs to be about relationship building, not card collecting. It’s not and will never be just a numbers game.

Focusing on what’s in it for you.

“Networking can be described as the process of interacting or engaging in communication with others for mutual assistance or support,” Akpoveta says. The mutual part is key here. If you’re always asking what somebody can do for you, it’s going to get old quick. Find out what the other person needs or is interested in, and make that happen. “We need to change our mindset from focusing on not just what we can get, but to also what we can give,” Akpoveta says. If you’re known as a person who can deliver, people are more likely to remember you — and more likely to reciprocate when you’re the one asking for a favor or a referral.

Not following up.

This sounds like a no-brainer, but how many of us have been rifling through a desk drawer and stumbled across the business card of someone who would make a great contact — if only you’d emailed them back when you met them months ago. “Think of each networking event as a speed dating exercise,” Augustine says. “If you get someone’s phone number but never call them afterwards, the evening was a waste.” Shoot off a quick note following your meeting. It doesn’t have to be elaborate: Just say, “Hi, it was great meeting you. I wanted to make sure you had my contact info, too, because I’d like to stay in touch.” Even a brief email can get the ball rolling.

21
Aug

4 Ways To Plan Your Career Path Now

{This article originally appeared on Glassdoor.}

As Stephen Covey would say, when planning out your career, you always want to think with the end in mind. This means paying attention to how today will affect your ultimate goals. Every action you take and each relationship you build will impact your future self down the road. Read more

14
Aug

How To Pull Yourself Out Of A Work Rut

{Click here to read the original article on Real Simple.}

Five experts share their go-to strategies. The good news: It can involve plenty of TV time. Read more

8
Aug

The Job Follow Ups: How To Follow Up Via Email Or Other Methods After The Job Application Is Submitted

{Click here to read the original article on Monster.com.}

We often hear that it’s good to follow up a week or so after sending a resume and/or applying for a job, especially if you don’t hear back from the company. What are some practical guidelines you would suggest for when and how to follow up — without being pesky?

Detail the Value You’d Add

Start by identifying the best person to speak with by checking with your network contacts or the firm’s front-desk staff, and determine what you want to say. When communicating with the hiring manager, express your enthusiasm for the opportunity and highlight why you would be the right fit for the role. For example, if you’re applying for a finance opening, mention the processes you implemented in a previous position to help the company significantly reduce costs and that you could assist the prospective employer in a similar fashion. As you conclude the discussion, ask about the next steps in the hiring process.

The key when following up with hiring managers is to avoid simply asking if they received your resume. Instead take the opportunity to demonstrate your initiative, show your enthusiasm and detail the value you can contribute to the firm.

DeLynn Senna, executive director of North American permanent placement services, Robert Half International

Use Your Network

One week is a good time frame for a follow-up. Follow up once. Unfortunately, many companies and recruiters just don’t have the bandwidth to personally respond to every job inquiry at the disappointment of many candidates. If you don’t have a contact name, search LinkedIn for the contact of the hiring manager or recruiting manager. Usually someone’s LinkedIn account is tied to their personal or work email address, and you can ask for an introduction through your network.

Lindsay Olson, partner, Paradigm Staffing

Keep It Short

Find a contact in the company/division of interest through professional networks. No matter what method of follow-up you choose (phone, email, professional network), express your interest in the position, highlight your top qualities that match the job, and keep your message short and to the point.

Describe how you would benefit the company with attaining its goals and list something relevant to their organization. Let them know you would be available to meet in person or over the phone to discuss your background further.

If you don’t hear back within a week, ask yourself: Is this a company/job you are really interested in? If so, reach out again.

Judy Ottaviano, recruiting manager, and Marybeth Lambert, executive recruiter, Wells Fargo

Check Your Spam Folder

Many organizations are receiving record-high numbers of applications these days, and often there isn’t time or staff to provide direct updates to every applicant. Check to see if the organization has an online application status tool. Many Web-based systems will provide real-time updates on application status, but sometimes you have to dig to find them. Also, check your email spam folder. Many systems will produce an automated note that confirms receipt of an application, or gives information about general timelines, but you won’t see it if it gets caught by your spam blocker.

If the automated tools can’t help, then give a call to the organization’s staff employment or personnel department.

Noah Apodaca, lead recruiter for staff at the University of California, Irvine

2
Aug

The Ultimate Cheat Sheet For Organizing Your Job Search

{Click here to read the original article on Glassdoor.}

When on the hunt for a job, it’s not uncommon to be applying for multiple opportunities at once. This is especially true for those of us just starting out in our careers. But multiple applications mean different resume versions, various cover letters and many, many different deadlines to keep track of. With so many moving parts at once, it’s easy to become disorganized. Read more

24
Jul

The Best Job For Everyone Else

{Click here to read the original article on The Muse.}

Early on in my senior year of college, I took a look around me. 90% of the smart, talented people I knew were clamoring for consulting jobs. Being a consultant meant advising the nation’s top companies on business strategy and receiving a generous salary, a bonus, and a future filled with glamorous cocktail parties and networking events.

I, being an English major, had never given much thought to consulting, but I figured, “If everyone wants this job, it has to be great, right?” The fact that I had never independently been interested in business was unimportant. I became filled with a frantic desire to land one of those coveted, prestigious jobs. Read more

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