Unemployment

8
Aug

The Job Follow Ups: How To Follow Up Via Email Or Other Methods After The Job Application Is Submitted

{Click here to read the original article on Monster.com.}

We often hear that it’s good to follow up a week or so after sending a resume and/or applying for a job, especially if you don’t hear back from the company. What are some practical guidelines you would suggest for when and how to follow up — without being pesky?

Detail the Value You’d Add

Start by identifying the best person to speak with by checking with your network contacts or the firm’s front-desk staff, and determine what you want to say. When communicating with the hiring manager, express your enthusiasm for the opportunity and highlight why you would be the right fit for the role. For example, if you’re applying for a finance opening, mention the processes you implemented in a previous position to help the company significantly reduce costs and that you could assist the prospective employer in a similar fashion. As you conclude the discussion, ask about the next steps in the hiring process.

The key when following up with hiring managers is to avoid simply asking if they received your resume. Instead take the opportunity to demonstrate your initiative, show your enthusiasm and detail the value you can contribute to the firm.

DeLynn Senna, executive director of North American permanent placement services, Robert Half International

Use Your Network

One week is a good time frame for a follow-up. Follow up once. Unfortunately, many companies and recruiters just don’t have the bandwidth to personally respond to every job inquiry at the disappointment of many candidates. If you don’t have a contact name, search LinkedIn for the contact of the hiring manager or recruiting manager. Usually someone’s LinkedIn account is tied to their personal or work email address, and you can ask for an introduction through your network.

Lindsay Olson, partner, Paradigm Staffing

Keep It Short

Find a contact in the company/division of interest through professional networks. No matter what method of follow-up you choose (phone, email, professional network), express your interest in the position, highlight your top qualities that match the job, and keep your message short and to the point.

Describe how you would benefit the company with attaining its goals and list something relevant to their organization. Let them know you would be available to meet in person or over the phone to discuss your background further.

If you don’t hear back within a week, ask yourself: Is this a company/job you are really interested in? If so, reach out again.

Judy Ottaviano, recruiting manager, and Marybeth Lambert, executive recruiter, Wells Fargo

Check Your Spam Folder

Many organizations are receiving record-high numbers of applications these days, and often there isn’t time or staff to provide direct updates to every applicant. Check to see if the organization has an online application status tool. Many Web-based systems will provide real-time updates on application status, but sometimes you have to dig to find them. Also, check your email spam folder. Many systems will produce an automated note that confirms receipt of an application, or gives information about general timelines, but you won’t see it if it gets caught by your spam blocker.

If the automated tools can’t help, then give a call to the organization’s staff employment or personnel department.

Noah Apodaca, lead recruiter for staff at the University of California, Irvine

2
Aug

The Ultimate Cheat Sheet For Organizing Your Job Search

{Click here to read the original article on Glassdoor.}

When on the hunt for a job, it’s not uncommon to be applying for multiple opportunities at once. This is especially true for those of us just starting out in our careers. But multiple applications mean different resume versions, various cover letters and many, many different deadlines to keep track of. With so many moving parts at once, it’s easy to become disorganized. Read more

12
Jun

Moving On: How To Quit Your Job With Grace

{Click here to read the original article on The Muse.}

You’ve finally decided to quit your job — congratulations!

Maybe you landed a great new gig and you’re moving on to greener pastures. Or, maybe you hate your boss and — let’s be honest — can’t wait to stick it to him with your two weeks’ notice.

But whatever the situation, quitting your job can be awkward and uncomfortable — and if you don’t have a clear plan of action, you might end up burning bridges and sacrificing valuable references down the road. Read more

9
Jan

How To Use LinkedIn To Get Multiple Job Offers

{Click here to read the original article on Career Enlightenment.}

Most job seekers follow what could generously be called the black hole strategy. They “update” their resume, trawl every job board available, and just start shooting out copies of their resume everywhere they can. Day after day, they send out dozens of resumes, so many that when a recruiter does call them, the job seeker can’t even remember what company they’re talking about.

Many people stay unemployed for years, robotically spamming out resumes day in and day out and never even considering that they might be doing something wrong. More commonly though, job seekers with at least some valuable skills will simply broaden their search and lower their standards until they get a job. It won’t be the job they want, it won’t pay very well, and it may not offer much in the way of future opportunities, but they simply won’t have a choice.

Thankfully, there’s a better way. Read more

27
Jun

No Means No? What to Do When You Don’t Get the Job.

{Click here to read the original article on The Muse.}

It’s a great day in anyone’s job search: A recruiter calls with a new job opening. You hear the details and get excited – it’s sounds like exactly what you’ve been looking for! You go to the interview, hit a home run, and leave the building feeling pretty confident that you’ll hear from them soon.

Two days later, you do – and you hear that they’ve chosen another candidate. Wait, what? Read more

20
Jun

How and When to Follow Up During Your Job Search

Every job seeker on the planet has experienced the agony of waiting to hear – about a job, an interview, a key contact, a next step in the selection process. These guidelines will help you minimize the waiting without antagonizing your contacts. Read more

7
Jun

Why Most People Quit Their Jobs

{Click here to read the original article on Money.}

Feeling stuck?

We’ve all heard sad stories of people quitting jobs to get away from gruesome bosses, unreasonable work hours, or places with weird smells, but in truth, the reasons people quit are often less dramatic – and more positive – than those horror stories might lead us to believe. A recent LinkedIn survey of over 10,000 people around the world found the reasons people quit are pretty universal. Read more

31
May

Reasons Not to Give Two Weeks Notice

{Click here to read the original article on About.com.}

Under normal circumstances, giving two weeks notice is standard practice. However, I often hear from employees who are working under very difficult circumstances or just started a job and know it isn’t going to work out and aren’t sure what to do.

Should they stick it out for another couple of weeks or are there times when you can give less than two weeks notice or no notice at all? Read more

7
Jul

How to Survive an Endless Job Hunt Without Losing It

{Click here to read the original article on The Muse.}

Telling you that it’s “tough out there” is a bit like saying the sun’s hot or that the Kardashians love attention—it’s self-evident, particularly if you’ve been hunting for a job and are tired of the endless rounds of leads and interviews that never seem to go anywhere.

Like Elmer Fudd tracking Bugs Bunny or Wile E. Coyote chasing down that sneaky Road Runner, always being the pursuer and never getting your mitts on the prize is pretty exhausting. How do you keep going in the face of constant rejection? Read more

9
Jun

Take a Job or Build a Career?

{Click here to read the original article on Careerrocketeer.}

From time to time I have a question come from job seekers along the lines of…

If I take this job, how will it look on my resume for the next time around?

It’s certainly a valid question to ask… but one that usually has no easy answer! Read more

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